A new issue of the People & Management newsletter is available

It’s all about listening.

Read it here. And let me know what you think.

What does work flexibility look like?

A meta-analysis of the existing research on flexibility identified the fundamental components:

  • Where we work,
  • When we work, and
  • How predetermined our schedule is.

These component parts lead to six distinct types of flexibility:

  1. Remote: “Work from anywhere” – Remote employees keep standard office hours but are location independent. Their office is wherever they are.
  2. DeskPlus: “Partially office-based” – DeskPlus employees keep standard office hours and are partially location independent.
  3. TravelLite: “Minimal travel requirements” – TravelLite employees have minimal to no travel, with a maximum limit of 10% travel annually.
  4. TimeShift: “Standardly unconventional hours” – TimeShift employees reorder their working hours to create a set but unconventional schedule (outside of 9-5 conventions) that optimizes their productivity and performance.
  5. MicroAgility: “Freedom to adapt” – MicroAgility employees have the autonomy to step away from their work 1-3 hours at a time to accommodate the unexpected.
  6. PartTime: “Reduced workload” – PartTime employees serve in senior-level roles; they have the experience and skills to meet the company objectives on a reduced hours schedule.

A new project: the People & Management Monthly Links newsletter

When my friend Xavier took an interest in my master’s thesis he started suggesting books and journal articles that he thought might be useful to my research. Soon thereafter I started doing the same whenever I bumped into something I thought might be useful to his doctoral dissertation (and later to his research and classes).
 
I also began doing this to other friends and colleagues. It had been (and still is) a great experience for me and I wanted others to experience the same.
 
This has been going on for decades now. Of course, paper cuttings and photocopies have become emails with links and attachments.
 
I am thinking it is time to broaden the circle. And that is why I am creating the People & Management Monthly Links newsletter.
 
The content of the newsletter will follow my consultancy practice and intellectual pursuits: leadership development and executive coaching, that is, people managing themselves, others, their team, and their organization.
 
My hope is that as a subscriber to the Monthly Links you will also become a contributor of material that might be interesting to other subscribers. Please send your suggestions by replying to the newsletter email you receive – you can subscribe here.
 
Happy reading!

Business buzzwords generator at the WSJ

Our modest contribution to horizontally push the envelope for thought leaders: Business Buzzwords Generator

Is PowerPoint a blessing or a curse?

This professor’s class notes provide a thorough (and practical) answer that I recommend to students and professors.

See also:

PowerPoint creators: Tufte is right, but…

Presentations and that creature called PowerPoint

and

How NOT to use PowerPoint for comic relief.

Stuff: the whole story

Story of stuff

A 20-minute video that will surely trigger a much-needed debate in your classroom.

The Corporation (2003) – a documentary film

the-corporation.jpg The winner of several international prizes, The Corporation is a documentary film that is a good discussion tool for business students/professors and -one would hope- professionals.

It is based on the book The Corporation: The Pathological Pursuit of Profit and Power by Joel Bakan.

Part 1 (with a promotional introduction):

and Part 2: