CEO unable to explain how one of his low-paid employees should budget her salary

 

Cultivate extreme indifference to both praise and blame

John Berryman’s advice to writers:

I would recommend the cultivation of extreme indifference to both praise and blame because praise will lead you to vanity, and blame will lead you to self-pity, and both are bad for writers.

Vanity and self-pity are bad for any professional.

h/t to Maria Popova

10 things you don’t know about yourself

You probably do not understand yourself as well as you think you do.

  1. Your perspective on yourself is distorted,
  2. Your motives are often a complete mystery to you,
  3. Outward appearances tell people a lot about you,
  4. Gaining some distance can help you know yourself better,
  5. We too often think we are better at something than we are,
  6. People who tear themselves down experience setbacks more frequently,
  7. You deceive yourself without realizing it,
  8. The “true self” is good for you,
  9. Insecure people tend to behave more morally,
  10. If you think of yourself as flexible, you will do much better.

 

More here.

Indra Nooyi on how to get more women in the C-suite

Indra Nooyi, former CEO of PepsiCo, in the New York Times:

The issue is not women in the C-suite, it’s a leaky pipeline. The pipeline is leaking at the early stages. Because we get enough women coming into the work force in various stages. But by the time they get to Level 2 and Level 3, they just drop out of the work force for several reasons.

One that can be addressed quickly is this tremendous unconscious bias. On top of that, the time that they get to Level 2 in a company is when they will have families, and many companies are not mandated to give parental leave. People just drop out of the work force, and then we wonder why they don’t go up to the top. We can ill afford to be a country where women drop out of the work force.

More here.

On the latest iteration of FB’s “vision”

John Naughton in The Guardian has a few choice words on Mark Zuckerberg’s recent “Memo to All”:

Dearly beloved, our reading this morning is taken from the latest Epistle of St Mark to the schmucks – as members of his 2.3 billion-strong Church of Facebook are known. The purpose of the epistle is to outline a new “vision” that St Mark has for the future of privacy, a subject that is very close to his wallet – which is understandable, given that he has acquired an unconscionable fortune from undermining it.

The rest of the story here.

I read John’s blog assiduously. You might enjoy it too.

 

 

A new issue of the People & Management newsletter is available

It’s all about listening.

Read it here. And let me know what you think.

What many bosses will not admit in public

They want machines to replace you as soon as possible.

“Few American executives will admit wanting to get rid of human workers, a taboo in today’s age of inequality.  So they’ve come up with a long list of buzzwords and euphemisms to disguise their intent:

Workers aren’t being replaced by machines, they’re being “released” from onerous, repetitive tasks.

Companies aren’t laying off workers, they’re “undergoing digital transformation.”

A 2017 survey by Deloitte found that 53 percent of companies had already started to use machines to perform tasks previously done by humans. The figure is expected to climb to 72 percent by next year”.

Source