10 things you don’t know about yourself

You probably do not understand yourself as well as you think you do.

  1. Your perspective on yourself is distorted,
  2. Your motives are often a complete mystery to you,
  3. Outward appearances tell people a lot about you,
  4. Gaining some distance can help you know yourself better,
  5. We too often think we are better at something than we are,
  6. People who tear themselves down experience setbacks more frequently,
  7. You deceive yourself without realizing it,
  8. The “true self” is good for you,
  9. Insecure people tend to behave more morally,
  10. If you think of yourself as flexible, you will do much better.

 

More here.

What makes a fulfilling life

Bertrand Russell on a fulfilling life:

Make your interests gradually wider and more impersonal, until bit by bit the walls of the ego recede, and your life becomes increasingly merged in the universal life.

An individual human existence should be like a river — small at first, narrowly contained within its banks, and rushing passionately past rocks and over waterfalls.

Gradually the river grows wider, the banks recede, the waters flow more quietly, and in the end, without any visible break, they become merged in the sea, and painlessly lose their individual being.

More here.

No todo es innovación y cambio

Para formar profesionales reflexivos, debemos tener en cuenta tres dimensiones:

  1. la capacidad de reflexionar sobre su práctica profesional,
  2. la capacidad de reflexionar sobre sí mismos en el contexto de su práctica profesional, y
  3. la capacidad de reflexionar sobre su práctica profesional en el contexto de su sociedad.

Y esto significa una visión amplia de la reflexión, que incluye

  • qué se piensa,
  • sobre qué se piensa,
  • cómo se piensa y
  • desde donde se piensa.

Y en este proceso es clave incorporar las humanidades en la formación de profesionales. No como complemento o decoración, sino como un camino de acceso privilegiado a la comprensión del propio lugar en el mundo.

Por eso la sumisión a la innovación y el cambio como valores absolutos arrastra en muchas personas la mentalidad de que no hay nada relevante que se pueda aprender o considerar de las grandes producciones canónicas de la humanidad

via Josep M. Lozano.

The model of rational choice is faulty

Virtually all of the assumptions built into it about human beings and the world are false:

  • It assumes that people are self-interested. Well, yes and no.
  • It assumes that there is a common scale of value on which everything can be compared. There isn’t.
  • It assumes that we can attach meaningful probabilities to outcomes. Sometimes we can, but life is not a roulette wheel or a series of coin flips, in which probabilities are well defined.

If we are to move toward societies of greater opportunity and justice, we need a more expansive notion of what it means to be rational than we will ever get from economics.

via Barry Schwartz.

Good governance went out of the window when a reductive view of human nature took hold

Simon Caulkin [website, @nikluac]  in The Guardian:

The irony is that we know what makes companies prosper in the long term. They manage themselves as whole systems, look after their people, use targets and incentives with extreme caution, keep pay differentials narrow (we really are in this together) and treat profits as the score rather than the game. And it’s a given that in the long term companies can’t thrive unless they have society’s interests at heart along with their own.

So why do so many boards and managers, supported by politicians, systematically do the opposite – run companies as top-down dictatorships, pursue growth by merger, destroy teamwork with runaway incentives, attack employment rights and conditions, outsource customer service, treat their stakeholders as resources to be exploited, and refuse wider responsibilities to society?

The answer is that management in the 1980s was subject to an ideological hijack by Chicago economics that put at the heart of governance a reductive “economic man” view of human nature needing to be bribed or whipped to do their exclusive job of maximising shareholder returns. Embedded in the codes, these assumptions now have the status of unchallenged truths.

Decline of ‘Western Civ’ in the undergrad? No problem, the MBA will take care of that

Survey courses in “Western Civilization,” once a common component of undergraduate curricula, have almost disappeared as a requirement at many large private research universities and public flagships, according to a study by the National Association of Scholars.

The report finds that, since 1968, the number of the selected colleges that require Western Civilization courses as a component of general education curricula and U.S. history as a component of history majors has dropped. ( via Inside Higher Ed)

Meanwhile,

the Dean of a well-ranked business school is proud to announce that his graduate studies contains a combination of character-building (often discussed as an outcome in high school)  and the humanities (often perceived to be the overall outcome of undergraduate education).

Go figure.

Film and philosophy

First and practically speaking, film as a medium is an exceptionally rich pedagogic tool which can encourage students brought up in a visual culture to engage with philosophy.

Beyond that, it reinvigorates a number of philosophical debates in aesthetics and philosophy of art.

It also contributes to contemporary debates in epistemology, metaphysics and ethics.

And finally it can serve to push philosophy to confront its residual iconoclasm that makes some of its practitioners fearful of images and the imaginary.

However uncanny the view of Plato’s cave as a metaphor for cinema seems, it is clear that the movies offer far more than illusion.

via TPM.